The Canny Gardener

how to be a smart gardener


Leave a comment

Open Squares day

The open squares day is a great day to visit gardens in London- big or small.  London’s hidden green spaces open their gates for public enjoyment and discovery.

The very first London Garden Square Day took place in 1998, with 43 gardens taking part.  The aim was to draw attention to the contribution that green spaces made to the city- in fact, almost half of London is green.   The open Squares days offer opportunity to explore those private and more secret gardens which are not generally accessible to the public and to join in the community events taking place.  Caroline Aldiss, a resident of Collingham Gardens at the time, founded the event in 1998-9 with the support of the London Parks and Gardens Trust and English Heritage. She thought that a day when all the green spaces could become open to the public, would be good event for the summer and for people to become interested in gardens and gardening.

This year I visited St. Mary’s secret garden in Hackney with its wonderful array of tables selling home-made produce such as jams and chutneys, honey, plants, bird houses, tea and cakes. Along with the buzz of people, bees and birds, it was a lively atmosphere and inspirational.  For over 25 years, St. Mary’s Secret Garden has offered a safe space where people with support needs  and the local community can get hands-on experience of gardening,  gain a sense of inclusion and receive the benefits of horticulture and other eco-therapy activities.

3DEDC4C7-5CBE-4E12-999B-2B1455114CC3.JPG20AB79EA-AEF9-4687-8518-F3E62B57E3B3.JPG29028F3C-78E3-41C0-AA76-2DCC45FAD5A2.JPG

IMG_1849.JPG

Advertisements


Leave a comment

Natural beauty

My friend Jonathan went out and found these lovely autumnal colours in the local park.

Autumn leaves.jpg

He took these photos and I wanted to share these with everyone because of what someone decided to do with the fallen leaves.  Ephemerally beautiful, arranged in the manner of the art of Andy Goldsworthy, these are worthy natural artworks by an unknown creative.

14691947_10154789918583968_4786104178814172485_o.jpg

But this kind of beauty is also found in many smaller seasonal vegetables and plants that I have been photographing recently-

IMG_3283.jpgIMG_3352.jpgIMG_3350.jpg

Spring is not the only time to find beauty in nature! In case you are interested, BBC has done a short film about why leaves change colour in autumn, which you can find here.

 

 


Leave a comment

wildflowers

Image

 

( a posy of wildflowers- wild geranium, euphorbia, buttercup, field genetian, forget me not, Green alkanet, sweet cicely, Mountain crane’s bill and the heavenly scented Butterfly bush)

We are so lucky in late spring to be blessed with wildflowers- many of whom are cousins of cultivars.  These are free, abundant and hardy.  While we have to be careful in picking these- for example, the Euphorbia shown here is a laxative!- we can still enjoy them whether in the garden or in a vase in our room.  I find these more delightful than cultivars- they seem to be naughtier, tinier cousins-daring you to pick them up. It was my son, in fact, who noticed the Butterfly bush with its deep scent- much nicer than any perfume or room freshener you could buy!

Such bits of wild spaces in the city attract bees, butterflies and birds- I heard the most delightful singing of birds when I was picking these flowers up.  As birdsong has decreased by 60% in the UK, wildflowers and spaces are the right thing to have in your garden.  Even one small container or pot with wildflowers will attract bees and butterflies as I know.  


1 Comment

the value of weeds

“Everyone born in this world has a unique role that only he or she can fulfill. Were this not the case, we would not be here. The universe never acts without cause; everything invariably has a reason for being. Even the weeds people love to loathe serve a purpose.”

Daisaku Ikeda

In the spring, amazingly beautiful weeds spring out of nowhere.  People seem to not like or enjoy the beautiful colours they bring- with no effort or cost. These weeds grow anywhere, cracks and crevices, with no need for watering or fertilisers.  They seem to be very hardy and resistant, coming up every year, despite being pulled out all the time. In spirit of these resilient creatures, I thought I should let them stay and play in my garden too.  Some are quite useful like the nettles (soups) and chickweed (for salads) and they grow in my garden, welcome and cheerful.

Below is a photo of a house nearby with its gloriously sunny and hardy crop of ‘weeds’ that never fails to bring a smile to my face.

Image